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Seymour Duncan Powerstage 170 Review

Updated: Apr 4


Welcome to the #Powerstage 170 Review. Please take the time to like and comment, and you can also subscribe to the YouTube channel if you watch the video demo.



The #SeymourDuncan Powerstage 170 is the smaller sibling of the Powerstage amplifiers with there being a 700, which is rack mounted, and a 200, which can be board mounted and also has a cab sim, 2 speaker outputs and a direct out for use with the sim.



However, the 170 is the one you want if all you want to do is power your modelling device – #Helix, #Kemper, #AxeFX, #QuadCortex etc – or if you use pre-amp pedals such as the Benson range so you can use them with a traditional guitar cab.



Features:


  • 170 watts

  • 3 band eq – Bass, Mids, Treble

  • 1 speaker output at 4, 8 or 16 Ohms

  • 5” x 5.24” x 2.84”

  • Weight 2 lbs




Not really too much to consider here as it really is a basic amp which just does the job it’s designed for beautifully.


This is why I bought it, and why I really like it.


In Use:



I wanted to use it with a Neural DSP Quad Cortex to power my traditional 2x12 Two Rock can when rehearsing and gigging.


I’m like a lot of guitar players out there in that I LOVE the functionality and flexibility of modern modellers, but going straight to front of house just doesn’t quite float my boat. I mean, I do it when I need to or when I don’t want to lug heavy cabs around, but I much prefer the sound of a real cab behind me when playing.


So, I wanted a clean, transparent, powerful amp that would be small enough to fit on a board with the Cortex, an expression pedal or two and my Line 6 G10-S, a simple wireless system. I tried out a couple of others, but it was the Powerstage 170 that really did the job the best.



It’s also quite dynamic, just want you want from a power amp. It doesn’t compress the signal, so you can rest assured the nuances of your playing that you’ve worked so hard to achieve won’t be lost.


Check out the demo here:





Although incredibly basic when it comes to features, it does have that 3 band EQ, which is really, really useful for dialling in a tone at different venues or with other guitars without having to menu dive and change presets on your modeller. A very welcome addition indeed.


Each EQ band has a + or – 13 dB level, with the bass being at 87 Hz, mids being at 712 Hz and treble at 6.61 kHz. I’m not sure what the Q is on these though as there appear to be no information available on this.




Powerwise, the 170 had no issues at all keeping up with the band and I’ve never even had it over half way up – it gets damn loud on an 8 ohm cab. One thing that is worth bearing in mind is that the 170 watt rating is measured at 4 Ohms.


Conclusion:


Pros:


Small Size

High Power

Clean Sound

EQ Controls

Looks great


Cons:


Not the cheapest, but you get what you pay for

Not many features – may want to check out the 200 version.



The Seymour Duncan Powerstage 170 is an amazing little box. It’ll provide enough clean power to your guitar cab for your modeller or pre-amp to seriously blast the audience. If you have any concerns about whether this is loud enough, you really don’t have to worry. Oh, and did I mention, it looks great too!

#guitar #amplifier #pedalboard

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